Keywords

visual rhetoric, medical imaging, surrealism, Brecht, collage, medical, Barthes

Abstract

This text outlines and applies a methodology for deciphering problems and producing new information by analyzing the artifacts produced by medical imaging technologies - text and images - using practices gleaned from Surrealists, semiologists, and visual artists, emphasizing its own form as being the product of the apparatuses that produce it and therefore untrustworthy. Its basic assumption is that every text contains the information necessary to solve problems of all sorts, though because of the limitations of this text in both form and authorial intellect, we may only reach a starting point for a solution herein. In this regard, we are deciphering rather than solving. Further, this text illustrates primarily through narratives how digital imaging technologies mediate our relationship with our doctors, illnesses, and our bodies. It explores how the artifacts produced by medical imaging technologies create a data stream that replaces the corporal patient, shifting the physician's focus from the whole body to pieces and parts. It is a study of texts and technologies. The method evolved from a rhetorical approach to examining the medical imaging artifacts and the processes by which those artifacts come into existence, with the method and form becoming part of the story, producing a wide array of new information that transcends disciplinary constraints.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2008

Advisor

Bowdon, Melody

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

English

Degree Program

Texts and Technology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0002193

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0002193

Language

English

Release Date

September 2008

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until September 2008; it will then be open access.

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