Keywords

Character recognition accuracy, Machine readability, Optical character recognition (OCR), Voting scheme

Abstract

This thesis is a benchmark performed on three commercial Optical Character Recognition (OCR) engines. The purpose of this benchmark is to characterize the performance of the OCR engines with emphasis on the correlation of errors between each engine. The benchmarks are performed for the evaluation of the effect of a multi-OCR system employing a voting scheme to increase overall recognition accuracy. This is desirable since currently OCR systems are still unable to recognize characters with 100% accuracy. The existing error rates of OCR engines pose a major problem for applications where a single error can possibly effect significant outcomes, such as in legal applications. The results obtained from this benchmark are the primary determining factor in the decision of implementing a voting scheme. The experiment performed displayed a very high accuracy rate for each of these commercial OCR engines. The average accuracy rate found for each engine was near 99.5% based on a less than 6,000 word document. While these error rates are very low, the goal is 100% accuracy in legal applications. Based on the work in this thesis, it has been determined that a simple voting scheme will help to improve the accuracy rate.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu

Graduation Date

2004

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Richie, Samuel

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Degree Program

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0000123

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0000123

Language

English

Release Date

January 2006

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Engineering and Computer Science; Engineering and Computer Science -- Dissertations, Academic

Restricted to the UCF community until January 2006; it will then be open access.

Share

COinS