Keywords

Distributed teams, configuration, transactive memory systems, cohesion

Abstract

Distributed teams continue to emerge in response to the complex organizational environments brought about by globalization, technological advancements, and the shift toward a knowledge-based economy. These teams are comprised of members who hold the disparate knowledge necessary to take on cognitively demanding tasks. However, knowledge coordination between team members who are not co-located is a significant challenge, often resulting in process loss and decrements to the effectiveness of team level knowledge structures. The current effort explores the configuration dimension of distributed teams, and specifically how subgroup formation based on geographic location, may impact the effectiveness of a team's transactive memory system and subsequent team process. In addition, the role of task cohesion as a buffer to negative intergroup interaction is explored.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2014

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Salas, Eduardo

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Industrial Organizational Psychology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0005449

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0005449

Language

English

Release Date

August 2014

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Sciences; Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic

Restricted to the UCF community until August 2014; it will then be open access.

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