Keywords

Robotic grasping, weighted random forest, support vector machine, decision tree, adaboost, image and point cloud feature, baxter research robot

Abstract

This method demonstrates an approach to determine the best grasping location on an unknown object using Weighted Random Forest Algorithm. It used RGB-D value of an object as input to find a suitable rectangular grasping region as the output. To accomplish this task, it uses a subspace of most important features from a very high dimensional extensive feature space that contains both image and point cloud features. Usage of most important features in the grasping algorithm has enabled the system to be computationally very fast while preserving maximum information gain. In this approach, the Random Forest operates using optimum parameters e.g. Number of Trees, Number of Features at each node, Information Gain Criteria etc. ensures optimization in learning, with highest possible accuracy in minimum time in an advanced practical setting. The Weighted Random Forest chosen over Support Vector Machine (SVM), Decision Tree and Adaboost for implementation of the grasping system outperforms the stated machine learning algorithms both in training and testing accuracy and other performance estimates. The Grasping System utilizing learning from a score function detects the rectangular grasping region after selecting the top rectangle that has the largest score. The system is implemented and tested in a Baxter Research Robot with Parallel Plate Gripper in action.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2014

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Behal, Aman

Degree

Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (M.S.E.E.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Degree Program

Electrical Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0005509

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0005509

Language

English

Release Date

December 2014

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Engineering and Computer Science; Engineering and Computer Science -- Dissertations, Academic

Restricted to the UCF community until December 2014; it will then be open access.

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