Abstract

Attitudinal research continues to show a more liberal trend in racial attitudes of Whites towards Blacks across a spectrum of issues (i.e. interracial marriage, residential integration, etc.) leading some to believe that we are moving into a post-racial society. However, a growing body of research has brought into question this utopian post-racial assertion. While Whites express support for racial equality in principle, they vehemently oppose race-targeted policies aimed to address racial inequality. This principle-policy gap has been consistently associated with persistent racial resentment; thus, contradicting the notion that of a post-racial era. Existing attitudinal research is often limited to the Black-White binary. Asian Americans in particular are often omitted from attitudinal research. Through a group threat framework, which argues that racial resentment occurs when there exists a threat to valued resources, this dissertation research examines racial attitudes towards Asian American in four domains: education, jobs, marriage, and residential integration. Given the stereotype of the model minority and the successes made by many Asian Americans, the project assesses whether there continues to be underlying racial resentment toward Asian Americans by Whites and whether the racial resentment is based in feelings of threat to valued resources. This study utilized an experimental list survey design, which addresses social desirability bias in traditional survey research. Quantitative analyses were conducted from a sample collected at a large public university. Traditional difference-in-means approach along with Ordinary Least Squares Regression were conducted to examine what factor(s) significantly predicted anger towards Asian Americans in these domains. Results suggests that group threat significantly predicted the presence of anger towards Asian Americans in the job domain, but not in the education, marriage, or residential domains. As group threat increased in the job domain, presence of anger also significantly increased. Results suggest that not every domain stimulates feelings of anger towards Asian Americans. Moreover, not every domain evokes feelings of threat to valued resources.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2016

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Carter, J. Scott

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Sociology

Degree Program

Sociology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006154

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006154

Language

English

Release Date

May 2016

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until May 2016; it will then be open access.

Included in

Sociology Commons

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