Abstract

Cohabitation and attitudes toward cohabitation have been of interest to social scientists since the 1970s. Early research on cohabitation concentrated on college aged students enrolled at institutions of higher learning. This trend was due to convenience sampling (Trost, 1978). Later research demonstrated the college population represented less than half of the total number of cohabitating persons. With the growth in numbers of persons who are choosing to cohabitate versus marrying, this study examines current attitudes towards cohabitation. This research augments the existing literature on attitudes toward cohabitation in the following ways: (1) it updates the current research on the attitudes toward cohabitation by using the 2012 General Social Survey, (2) it examines cohort differences in attitudes toward cohabitation among the four major birth cohorts in our society today (i.e., the Silent Generation, the Baby Boomer cohort, Generation X, and the Millennial cohort), and (3) it controls for other factors that affect attitudes toward cohabitation.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2016

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Gay, David

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Sociology

Degree Program

Applied Sociology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006181

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006181

Language

English

Release Date

5-15-2017

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until 5-15-2017; it will then be open access.

Included in

Sociology Commons

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