Abstract

With the advent of nature photography and film came new ways to understand and interpret the natural world. Prior to the 1910s these formats involved a more scientific and objective approach to recording nature. This aesthetic was abandoned in favor for narrative recreations and Hollywood structure after the 1930s. It is my belief that the dominant use of anthropomorphization, manipulations of setting and animal life, and rugged explorer motifs, all have lead to a loss of a more contemplative and meditative appreciation of nature within the Nature television and film format. It is my goal to explore through a series of videos how one can more naturally represent a setting through the use of perspective and compositional framing, matching the natural rhythms of a setting through editing and motion, and being conscious of the viewers sense of placement in a space. I intend to visually demonstrate how a more organic, situated, and less Hollywood-style of interpreting nature can lead to a deeper and more meaningful appreciation of it.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2016

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Peters, Philip

Degree

Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

Visual Arts and Design

Degree Program

Emerging Media; Digital Media

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006490

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006490

Language

English

Release Date

December 2016

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until December 2016; it will then be open access.

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