Abstract

A manned mission to Mars would be the longest manned mission (both by distance and duration) to date by a considerable margin. Such a mission poses a unique set of challenges to astronaut teams, including extreme levels of isolation and confinement never before experienced by Earth-bound teams. A crucial step in ensuring the team will arrive back on Earth safely is selecting those individuals who are most apt for the job. To facilitate the selection process and development of countermeasures, this work (as part of a larger NASA research grant) involves examining the relationship between personality (Big 5; openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, emotional stability) and the team role sub-dimensions, which are defined as patterns of behavior which comprise team roles, of sociability, task orientation, and dominance. Additionally, I will also examine to what extent enacting team roles (e.g., 'Critic', 'Entertainer', 'Team Player', etc.) ensures mission success, such that more effective teams will distribute team roles as needed. The data for this project was derived from NASA's HERA (Human Exploration Research Analog), a study environment meant to simulate long-duration space exploration missions. In addition to presenting hypotheses and data analyses, implications and future steps will also be addressed.

Graduation Date

2018

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Burke, Shawn

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Industrial and Organization Psychology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007248

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007194

Language

English

Release Date

August 2018

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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