Abstract

This study explored risk factors associated with the arrest for adolescent to parent abuse (ATPA) when compared to arrest for a similar violent misdemeanor against a non-parent. The phenomenon of ATPA is widely under-researched and there is little in terms of prevention policy or treatment. Using 18,548 risk assessment screens performed with adolescents (12-17) arrested in Florida for a violent misdemeanor, and guided by previous literature and social ecological and social bond theories, this analysis explored the relationship between risk factors (categorized as individual characteristics, beliefs, behavior, commitment and involvement and attachment) and arrest for ATPA versus arrest for a violent misdemeanor against a non-parent. Of the 17 hypothesized risk factors, 9 risk factors were found to be significant risk factors associated with the arrest for ATPA versus the arrest for a violent misdemeanor against a non-parent. Age and ethnicity/race were both found to be associated with ATPA arrests. Risk factors found to increase the likelihood of being arrested for ATPA included a history of mental health problems, the adolescent witnessing domestic violence, the adolescent being a victim of abuse, and adolescents' normative beliefs in resolving conflict. The findings of this study add to the current body of literature and can be used to inform the creation of new policies and interventions in the realm of ATPA and family violence.

Graduation Date

2018

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Yegidis, Bonnie

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Health and Public Affairs

Degree Program

Public Affairs; Social Work

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007211

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007165

Language

English

Release Date

August 2018

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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