Abstract

The brewing industry generates $350 billion in revenue in the US annually, representing 1.9% of the gross domestic product. Spoilage is a persistent problem throughout production and distribution that causes economic loss, and is therefore meticulously avoided. Contrarily, artisanal sour beers are necessarily produced by a diverse variety of these spoilage organisms metabolically interacting in symbiosis as a microbial ecosystem. We sought to gain insight into factors driving assembly of microbial communities by testing a long-debated Darwinian hypothesis. A collection of community members were screened in co-culture and novel bioinformatics tools were developed to predict observed interactions. A fundamental understanding of these relationships is paramount to beer production and sets a precedent for the study of similar microbial communities that impact human health.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2017

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Moore, Sean

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Medicine

Department

Biomedical Sciences

Degree Program

Biotechnology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007288

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007288

Language

English

Release Date

June 2018

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until June 2018; it will then be open access.

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