Abstract

This study attempts to make steps toward filling significant gaps in the followership literature. The study of followership has often been seen through the lens of leaders' ability to impart change in follower behavior. In doing so, the literature has primarily focused on leader behavior as the agent of change rather than acknowledging followers as active agents in their own behaviors. However, some recent research has shown the emergence of followers as the primary focus, even looking at how their actions can change the way leaders act. This research focuses primarily on followership role orientations as mental models which specify the attributes an individual expects good followers to possess. In particular, follower personality traits, core self-evaluations, and self-construal were investigated as antecedents of followership role orientations (co-production and passive). Additionally, the relationship between these role orientations and enacted follower behavior (voice and upward delegation) were examined with task-specific self-efficacy investigated as a moderating variable. While most of the antecedents proved to be significant predictors, some of the coefficient directions were unexpected. Finally, results indicated that both role orientations were significant predictors of voice behavior and upward delegation.

Graduation Date

2018

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Burke, Shawn

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007346

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007346

Language

English

Release Date

December 2018

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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