Abstract

Thulium fiber lasers have the broadest emission wavelength bandwidth out of any rare-earth doped fiber lasers. The emission wavelength starts from 1.75μm and ends at around 2.15μm, covering a vast swath of the eye safe wavelength region and intersecting with a large portion of mid-infrared atmospheric transmission window. Also, thulium fiber lasers provide the highest average output power of any other rare-earth doped fiber lasers in these wavelength regimes, making them uniquely suited for applications such as remote sensing. At the moment, high power beam propagation of continuous wave laser through the atmosphere in the mid-infrared range is yet to be investigated anywhere. In particular, the effects of atmospheric water vapors on the thulium fiber laser propagation are unknown and are of great research interest. This dissertation identifies the stringent requirements in constructing a high power, single frequency, wavelength tunable, continuous wave thulium fiber laser with the aim of using it to study various atmospheric transmission effects. A fine spectral control scheme using diffraction gratings is explored and improvements are made. Moreover, a fiber numerical simulation model is presented and is used for designing and implementing the thulium fiber laser system. The current limitations of the implemented system are discussed and an improved system is proposed. This will lay the foundation for the future high power atmospheric propagation studies.

Graduation Date

2018

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Richardson, Martin

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Optics and Photonics

Department

Optics and Photonics

Degree Program

Optics and Photonics

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007372

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007372

Language

English

Release Date

December 2023

Length of Campus-only Access

5 years

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Campus-only Access)

Share

COinS