Abstract

Teachers are being pushed to the brink of burnout and leaving the profession, placing teachers' health and wellness in jeopardy (Daniels & Strauss, 2009; Maslach & Leiter, 2008; Stephenson, 2012; Vladut & Kallay, 2010; Wilkerson, 2009). Yet, it has become increasingly clear teacher stress may start prior to entering the profession (Brown & Ryan, 2003, Darling-Hammond, 2006). The researcher used a non-experimental design to evaluate the perceived stress among pre-service teachers enrolled in internship, and if the coping style of mindfulness had any correlation on self-reported stress levels. The quantitative study surveyed 332 student interns using the Perceived Stress Survey (Cohen & Williams, 1988) to depict perceived stress levels of pre-service teachers. A demographic questionnaire was also administered. The results indicated an increase in perceived stress, suggesting that stress may vary across the demographic variables of gender. Mindfulness was researched as a potential solution, however, there was no correlation between mindfulness and stress levels. education is necessary in the discussion and implementation of mindfulness as a potential intervention tool for stress. Further research is needed for a deeper understanding of gender, and how mindfulness may be a positive intervention to perceived stress.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2019

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Russell, William

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Community Innovation and Education

Department

School of Teacher Education

Degree Program

Education; Social Science Education

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007628

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007628

Language

English

Release Date

August 2019

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Included in

Education Commons

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