Abstract

The foundations of a democratic society are the citizens who engage in its political processes and functions. The democratic skills and dispositions needed to be engaged citizens must be embedded within the school system of that society. In the United States, teachers serve as the delivery system of these skills and dispositions, and it is therefore imperative to understand who these teachers are as citizens. Leveraging survey research and various quantitative measures, the civic attitudes and civic knowledge of teacher candidates in various fields were investigated. Using self-reported demographic information, teacher candidates were compared based on their academic program track, gender, race, and status as a college student (first generation or other). Initial findings indicate statistically significant differences in the mean civic attitudinal scores and civic knowledge based on program track and college student status. How the findings may influence the long-term outlook of civic education and the needs for preparing future teachers are discussed.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu.

Graduation Date

2019

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Russell, William

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Community Innovation and Education

Department

School of Teacher Education

Degree Program

Education; Social Science Education

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007633

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007633

Language

English

Release Date

August 2022

Length of Campus-only Access

3 years

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Campus-only Access)

Share

COinS