Abstract

The present work is intended to bring awareness to medical professionals impacted by the occurrence of errors they have committed or witnessed (i.e., second-victims) and highlight the negative effects that may result from such errors. The purpose of this research is to test whether resilience and negative affect that is experienced after a medical error are related. Additionally, four variables are tested as moderators of this relationship, two of which are considered individual variables (i.e., self-efficacy and work meaningfulness), and two of which are characterized as external variables (i.e., co-worker support and organizational support). Twenty-two healthcare professionals from a hospital's Cardio-Vascular Intensive Care Unit participated in a short survey. Results showed a relationship exists between resilience and negative affect experienced by second victims, post-error. The limitations of the current work, practical implications, and ideas for future research will be expanded upon herein.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2019

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Burke, Shawn

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007651

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007651

Language

English

Release Date

August 2019

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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