Abstract

Managed lanes (MLs) have been implemented as a vital strategy for traffic management and traffic safety improvement. The majority of previous studies involving MLs have explored a limited scope of the impact of the MLs segments as a whole, without considering the safety and operational effects of the access design. Also, there are limited studies that investigated the effect of connected vehicles (CVs) on managed lanes. Hence, this study has two main objectives: (1) the first objective is achieved by determining the optimal managed lanes access design, including accessibility level and weaving distance for an at-grade access design. (2) the second objective is to study the effects of applying CVs and CV lanes on the MLs network. Several scenarios were tested using microscopic traffic simulation to determine the optimal access design while taking into consideration accessibility levels and weaving lengths. Both safety (e.g., standard deviation of speed, time-to-collision, and conflict rate) and operational (e.g., level of service, average speed, average delay) performance measures were included in the analyses. For the first objective, the results suggested that one accessibility level is the optimal option for the 9-mile network. A weaving length between 1,000 feet to 1,400 feet per lane change was suggested based on the safety analysis. From the operational perspective, a weaving length between 1,000 feet and 2,000 feet per lane change was recommended. The findings also suggested that MPR% between 10% and 30% was recommended when the CVs are only allowed in MLs. When increasing the number of MLs, the MPR% could be improved to reach 70%. Lastly, the findings proposed that MPR% of 100% could be achieved by allowing the CVs to use all the lanes in the network.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2019

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering

Degree Program

Civil Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007719

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007719

Language

English

Release Date

August 2019

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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