Abstract

Temporary workers may experience unique and oftentimes stressful work situations that can precipitate negative outcomes for these workers, their coworkers, and their organizations. The current study considered broader implications of the various work experiences among temporary workers by testing the relationships of workplace stressors to temporary workers' behaviors. The workplace stressors examined were chosen based on their salience to temporary workers as shown throughout the current temporary worker literature, and included economic stressors, interpersonal mistreatment, and organizational constraints. It was hypothesized that these stressors would predict temporary workers' behaviors via emotional exhaustion and moral disengagement pathways, predicting the performance of counterproductive work behaviors (CWB). Three waves of data were collected from multiple sources, including at a temporary staffing agency, at a large university, and using the MTurk platform. Results showed that the temporary workers varied in their experiences of workplace stressors, which were linked to both cognitive and emotional reactions, which consequently predicted CWB. More specifically, temporary workers who experienced higher levels of workplace stressors reported higher levels of emotional exhaustion and moral disengagement, and then these reactions were linked to an increased likelihood of performing behaviors that are harmful to the organization and/or others within the organization.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2019

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Shoss, Mindy

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007730

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007730

Language

English

Release Date

August 2019

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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