Abstract

Social, political, and economic transformations contributed to redefine gender roles at the beginning of the twentieth century. In Latin America, Alfonsina Storni (1889-1938), Gabriela Mistral (1892-1957) and Silvina Ocampo (1906-1993) produced a hybrid narrative that challenged heteronormative conventions. In dialogue with a global realignment, they advocated for the rights of mestiza, indigenous, and working class subjects. This thesis proposes that the authors participated in a worldwide transformation that established women as historical agents. The research incorporates poems, essays, and short stories to map the emergence of independent, clever, and ambiguous models of femininity. They deployed traditional archetypes, such as the Virgin Mary, and modern subjectivities to contest the social norms that underpin patriarchy. Storni, Mistral, and Ocampo transgressed and redefined social hierarchies inherited from intellectual elites representing underprivileged populations. We observe a crosspollination of journalism and literature that includes corporeal and mystical elements. These authors actively fought for gender equality and became influential cultural producers. Mistral, for instance, was the first Latin American writer to win the Nobel Prize in Literature. Their achievements inspire and encourage contemporary Latino women to challenge social norms and become cultural producers.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2019

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Izquierdo Jimenez, Lucas

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

Modern Languages

Degree Program

Spanish

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007758

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007758

Language

Spanish

Release Date

June 2020

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Campus-only Access)

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