Keywords

Pedestrians, Tracking (Engineering)

Abstract

The purpose of this dissertation is to address the problem of predicting pedestrian movement and behavior in and among crowds. Specifically, we will focus on an agent based approach where pedestrians are treated individually and parameters for an energy model are trained by real world video data. These learned pedestrian models are useful in applications such as tracking, simulation, and artificial intelligence. The applications of this method are explored and experimental results show that our trained pedestrian motion model is beneficial for predicting unseen or lost tracks as well as guiding appearance based tracking algorithms. The method we have developed for training such a pedestrian model operates by optimizing a set of weights governing an aggregate energy function in order to minimize a loss function computed between a model's prediction and annotated ground-truth pedestrian tracks. The formulation of the underlying energy function is such that using tight convex upper bounds, we are able to efficiently approximate the derivative of the loss function with respect to the parameters of the model. Once this is accomplished, the model parameters are updated using straightforward gradient descent techniques in order to achieve an optimal solution. This formulation also lends itself towards the development of a multiple behavior model. The multiple pedestrian behavior styles, informally referred to as "stereotypes", are common in real data. In our model we show that it is possible, due to the unique ability to compute the derivative of the loss function, to build a new model which utilizes a soft-minimization of single behavior models. This allows unsupervised training of multiple different behavior models in parallel. This novel extension makes our method unique among other methods in the attempt to accurately describe human pedestrian behavior for the myriad of applications that exist. The ability to describe multiple behaviors shows significant improvements in the task of pedestrian motion prediction.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2011

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Tappen, Marshall F.

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004043

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004043

Language

English

Release Date

August 2011

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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