Abstract

Extreme operating temperatures within the turbine section of jet engines require sophisticated methods of cooling and material protection. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) achieve this through a ceramic coating applied to a substrate material (nickel-based superalloy). Electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) is the industry standard coating used on jet engines. By tailoring the microstructure of an emerging deposition method, Plasma-spray physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD), similar microstructures to that of EB-PVD coatings can be fabricated, allowing the benefits of strain tolerance to be obtained while improving coating deposition times. This work investigates the strain through depth of uncycled and cycled samples using these coating techniques with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). In the TGO, room temperature XRD measurements indicated samples of both deposition methods showed similar in-plane compressive stresses after 300 and 600 thermal cycles. In-situ XRD measurements indicated similar high-temperature in-plane and out-of-plane stress in the TGO and no spallation after 600 thermal cycles for both coatings. Tensile in-plane residual stresses were found in the YSZ uncycled PS-PVD samples, similar to APS coatings. PS-PVD samples showed in most cases, higher compressive residual in-plane stress at the YSZ/TGO interface. These results provide valuable insight for optimizing the PS-PVD processing parameters to obtain strain compliance similar to that of EB-PVD. Additionally, external cooling methods used for thermal management in jet engine turbines were investigated. In this work, an additively manufactured lattice structure providing transpiration cooling holes is designed and residual strains are measured within an AM transpiration cooling sample using XRD. Strains within the lattice structure were found to have greater variation than that of the AM solid wall. These results provide valuable insight into the viability of implementing an AM lattice structure in turbine blades for the use of transpiration cooling.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2019

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Raghavan, Seetha

Degree

Master of Science in Aerospace Engineering (M.S.A.E.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Program

Aerospace Engineering; Space System Design and Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007844

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007844

Language

English

Release Date

December 2019

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until December 2019; it will then be open access.

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