Keywords

Boron nitride; ammonium perchlorate

Abstract

The decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate (AP), a strong oxidizer used in solid rocket propellant, is widely studied in an attempt to increase the burn characteristics of propellants. Many materials have been shown to catalyze its decomposition, but little is known about the mechanism by which AP decomposition becomes catalyzed. In this study, Boron Nitride (BN) nanostructures, a material previously unknown to act as a catalyst, is studied. The decomposition reaction is studied by thermo-gravimetric analysis / differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The goal of this study is to discover the activation energy of this catalyst reaction, intermediary products of the reaction, mechanism of reaction and end state of the boron nitride nanostructures (ie, if the BN acts as a true catalyst, or participates on the overall reaction and has some end state that*s different from the initial state). Four variations of BN have been synthesized using a hydrothermal process; BN nanoribbons, Boron Rich BN, Nitrogen-Rich BN, and high surface area BN. It is shown that the decomposition of AP is significantly altered when in the presence of BN and the mechanism through which BN catalyzes the decomposition is most likely the presence of oxidized nitrogen species on the BN material.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2015

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Seal, Sudipta

Degree

Master of Science in Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.M.S.E.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Materials Science Engineering

Degree Program

Engineering and Computer Science

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0005801

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0005801

Language

English

Release Date

August 2015

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Engineering and Computer Science; Engineering and Computer Science -- Dissertations, Academic

Restricted to the UCF community until August 2015; it will then be open access.

Included in

Engineering Commons

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