Abstract

The deficit narrative about marginalized students of color attributes their failure in school to some nature of innate cognitive deficiency, cultural, social, and familial dysfunctions among other schools of thoughts. The purpose of this grounded theory study is to provide a rich description about this phenomenon and to propose theoretical pedagogical adjustments in the classroom as it relates to educating students of color. The study applies Charmaz (2014) Constructivist approach to grounded theory methods to examine the following research questions: (RQ1) How do teachers' narratives about students of color depict their teaching experiences and (RQ2) How do teachers' narratives about students of color inform students learning? Two overarching themes emerged in this study: practicing color blindness impacts cultural responsiveness while perpetuate deficit thinking, and understanding cultural background stimulates sensitivity when designing curriculum for students of color. The findings of this research demonstrate teachers' deficit thinking depicts their pedagogical practices and informs students learning. The research has both practical and theoretical implications for dispelling the deficit thinking regarding students of color.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2019

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Olan, Elsie

Degree

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

College

College of Community Innovation and Education

Department

School of Teacher Education

Degree Program

Secondary Education; English Language Arts Education

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007779

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007779

Language

English

Release Date

December 2019

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until December 2019; it will then be open access.

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