Abstract

The prescription of aerobic exercise modalities engaging the arm musculature have the potential to extend the reach of physical activity and promote cardiorespiratory fitness in individuals with lower body impairment due to excessive body mass, and among individuals seeking to complement and diversify standard leg training. This study compared the acute cardiopulmonary responses obtained during arm cycling and leg cycling performed at different intensities among lean and average (LA) and overfat and obese individuals (OFO). Participants were 37 young and relatively healthy adults. They were tested for mode-specific peak power output and work rate at ventilatory threshold during two randomized maximal incremental protocol tests. The experiments were four randomized constant work rate isocaloric protocols for arm cycling and leg cycling performed at heavy and moderate exercise intensities based on participants' ventilatory threshold and peak power output obtained from the maximal incremental protocol tests. All experiments were matched for the same caloric expenditure of 100 kcal. Cardiopulmonary parameters and the time to expend 100 kcal (Tkcal100) were recorded. Tkcal100 was increased for the OFO in comparison to the LA group. Among the cardiopulmonary parameters measured in this study, only oxygen uptake relative to body mass was significantly different between groups; however, differences were no longer evident when oxygen uptake values were considered relative to fat-free mass. Furthermore, cardiopulmonary variables are more affected by exercise intensity than exercise mode, while responses to different intensities are not necessarily proportional. Young adults with excess body fat appear to respond less favorably to acute exercise when compared to lean and average body composition individuals, as evidenced by a longer Tkcal100.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2021

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Fukuda, David

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Community Innovation and Education

Department

Learning Sciences and Educational Research

Degree Program

Education; Exercise Physiology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0009100; DP0026433

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0026433

Language

English

Release Date

February 2022

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until February 2022; it will then be open access.

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