Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the mental health services being provided to students in the state of Florida, specifically the identification of mental health concerns among students, prevention strategies, and interventions utilized. This study consisted of a document analysis of the Mental Health Assistance Allocation Plans submitted to, and posted by, the Florida Department of Education, for the purpose of developing a grounded theory to standardize the recommended practices in serving the mental health needs of students. Standardized recommended practices that emerged from the analysis included (a)universal screening to identify students demonstrating or developing mental health concerns, (b) establishing consistency within the school/school district and a positive school culture, (c) training faculty, staff, and students regarding mental health concerns and how to support/connect with resources connecting with the community to coordinate care, (d) involving families and parents and collaborate with outside or community mental health agencies; (e) keeping ratios between students and mental health professionals as low as possible in order to maximize direct contact between students and their mental health providers, and (f) information sharing between school districts and community or outside mental health partners and providers, while protecting student information.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2021

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Vitale, Thomas

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Community Innovation and Education

Department

Educational Leadership and Higher Education

Degree Program

Educational Leadership; Executive

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008631;DP0025362

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0025362

Language

English

Release Date

August 2021

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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