Abstract

One of the fundamental mechanisms for detonation initiation is turbulence induced deflagration-to-detonation transition (tDDT). This research experimentally explores the dynamics of highly turbulent fast flames that are characterized by extremely high turbulent flame speeds, experience increased effects of compressibility, and may develop a runaway acceleration combined with a pressure buildup that leads to tDDT. The flame dynamics and reacting flow field are characterized using simultaneous high-speed particle image velocimetry, OH* chemiluminescence, pressure measurements, and schlieren imaging. We study various regimes of fast flame propagation conditions for runaway acceleration of turbulent fast flames and effects of compressibility on the evolution of these flames. When the local measured turbulent flame speed is found to be greater than the Chapman-Jouguet deflagration speed, the flame is categorized to be at the runaway transition regime that eventually leads to a detonation.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2021

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Ahmed, Kareem

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Program

Aerospace Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008635;DP0025366

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0025366

Language

English

Release Date

August 2026

Length of Campus-only Access

5 years

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Campus-only Access)

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