Abstract

Poor communication is identified as the root cause for the majority of sentinel events in hospitals, including wrong site surgery, medication errors, and failure to rescue. Interdisciplinary rounding (IDR), a long-standing practice in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), provides a forum for communication and collaboration and has been linked to improved patient outcomes. Most of the research regarding IDR has been performed in the ICU setting within academic medical centers. IDR outside of the ICU has demonstrated similar clinical outcomes but a gap exists in the literature regarding the impact of IDR participation on the nurse, particularly for nurses working in the non-ICU setting within community hospitals. This led to the development of a research question. Basic Psychological Needs Theory was chosen as the theoretical framework – to specifically assess how participation in IDR affected the nurses' sense of autonomy, competence, and relatedness. A mixed method study was conducted in a community hospital in Central Florida using surveys and semi-structured interviews. Results indicated ICU nurses perceived a higher level of collaboration with physicians than nurses working outside of the ICU but this did not correlate with satisfaction of the ICU nurses' basic psychological needs. Only the nurses' level of experience and advanced nursing education appeared to have any significant impact on satisfaction of the nurses' basic psychological needs. The interview responses confirmed the presence of different rounding processes and levels of collaboration outside of the ICU, which helped to explain and support study outcomes. Opportunities for process improvements were also identified.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2020

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Sole, Mary Lou

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Nursing

Department

Nursing

Degree Program

Nursing

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008769;DP0025500

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0025500

Language

English

Release Date

6-15-2021

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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