Abstract

Medication nonadherence and lack of transition readiness are global challenges for individuals living with epilepsy and their families. Medication adherence measures the level of compliance with healthcare providers' treatment recommendations. Transition readiness is the gradual steps patients take to develop independence and self-management as they transfer from pediatric to adult healthcare models. Factors impacting medication adherence and transition readiness skills include developmental stage/age; forgetfulness; family/caregivers; socioeconomic status; knowledge/attitude about the disease; side effects; number of medications; and subjective and objective quantifications of adherence. One promising intervention for patients and families is mobile technology used for reaching, teaching, and communicating. However, no study has tested how mobile applications (m-apps) effect both medication adherence and transition readiness. This four-week study's primary aim was to test Medilepsy's (an m-app) effect on medication adherence in adolescents and young adults with epilepsy (AYA), ages 16-24, with and without caregiver support. Secondary aims were to examine Medilepsy's effect on transition readiness skills and evaluate usability, ease of use, and satisfaction. A one-group, quasi-experimental pre-post study design was used. A repeated measures test analyzed changes in medication adherence at five times. A Wilcoxon test analyzed mean pre-post transition readiness scores. There was no significant improvement in medication adherence mean scores. Significant improvement was demonstrated in self-reported pre-post transition readiness mean scores, with greatest improvement in two domains: Appointment Keeping by 13.75% and Managing Medications by 11.25%. The highest usability mean scores were 6.09 of 7 in ease of use, interface, and satisfaction. Participants scored Medilepsy 82.3% of 100%. This study contributes to chronic disease self-management science illustrating how Medilepsy reaches and engages AYA and caregivers. Future studies will expand the Medilepsy platform and include different research designs, longer study durations, younger and more diverse participants.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2021

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Talbert, Steven

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Nursing

Department

Nursing

Degree Program

Nursing

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008909; DP0026188

Language

English

Release Date

December 2021

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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