Abstract

Introduction: Since nurses are expected to be constantly available and responsive, their workflow is interrupted about 85 times each shift. As nursing students socialize to the profession, they need to learn how to adapt to an interruption fraught practice environment. Background: While some interruptions are important to patient care, dealing with conflicting demands can lead to mental fatigue, increased task time, and enhanced propensity for errors. Some experienced nurses learn to create strategies that facilitate remembering to resume an interrupted task, but they are often adopted through trial and error. When simulation-based education (SBE) is used according to industry standards, it is an excellent modality to teach interruption management. Methods: The purpose of this dissertation was to explore the optimal use of SBE to facilitate the adaptation of nursing students to an interruption-fraught practice environment. An integrative literature review (ILR) was performed to explore the use of SBE to teach interruption management. A between-subjects randomized trial using checklist guided observations and the NASA-Task Load Index facilitated determining the impact of purposeful training combined with SBE. To understand how to best facilitate adaptation, the Roy Adaptation Theory was explored. Results: The ILR showed that most SBE studies used to teach interruption management are not predicated on purposeful training. The randomized trial demonstrated that combining purposeful training with SBE was more beneficial than SBE alone. Discussion: The results from this research can inform nursing education about the need to combine purposeful interruption management training with SBE to facilitate coping with interruptions. Keywords: Simulation-based education, pre-licensure nursing students, interruption management, Adaptation

Notes

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Graduation Date

2021

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Talbert, Steven

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Nursing

Department

Nursing

Degree Program

Nursing

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008924; DP0026203

Language

English

Release Date

November 2022

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Campus-only Access)

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