Abstract

Ultraviolet filters are active ingredients in sunscreen that protect us from harmful UV radiation. However, organic UV filters are thought to have adverse effects on the environment and humans. In recent years, fear of harmful impacts of sunscreen has caused a surge of coral reef safe sunscreens to hit the market. These sunscreens, which contain inorganic metal oxides as UV filters, have been accepted as safe for humans and the environment until recently. Metal oxides in reef safe sunscreens may form intermediates in the water that can harm marine life and can absorb through the skin and into the blood, possibly disrupting normal bodily function. In this study, a 48-hour bioassay was run with Artemia salina and various UV filters at different concentrations to determine at what levels of exposure and to which UV filters the organism is sensitive. Three trials were run with one organism in each of the 200 bioassay wells and 20 replicates per treatment. At each data collection time, organism survival outcomes were recorded. Results showed significant difference between trials but not between treatments. This project serves to research the impact sunscreen has on A. salina and potential environmental and human health impacts.

Thesis Completion

2020

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Donnelly, Melinda

Co-Chair

Walters, Linda

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Biology

Degree Program

Biology

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2020

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