Abstract

Second-generation immigrants are increasingly embracing their biculturalism, equally identifying as American and "other" (Yazykova & McLeigh, 2015). While this allows for ethnic diversity as well as other social and linguistic advantages, the internalization of two different cultures has been linked to causing tensions related to identity development and mental health (Huynh et al., 2018; Ceri et al., 2017; Ritsner & Ponizovsky, 1999). Previous research has shown a link between parental support and an individual's acculturation and psychological well-being (Pawliuk et al., 1996; Abad & Sheldon, 2008). This study seeks to further examine the influence of family on the bicultural identity integration and psychological distress in second-generation immigrants. Researchers recruited 39 participants to explore the relationship of family life satisfaction, family social support, bicultural harmony and blendedness, and self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. A bivariate correlation analysis showed that satisfaction with family life was negatively associated with depression, stress, and overall psychological distress. In addition, perceived social support from family appeared to have a positive relationship to higher scores of depression. Researchers also found that bicultural identity integration had a negative relationship with anxiety, stress, and overall psychological distress.

Thesis Completion

2020

Semester

Fall

Thesis Chair

White, Grace

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

12-1-2020

Included in

Psychology Commons

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