Keywords

Biofeedback training, Electromyography

Abstract

Ten college students serving as volunteer subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group received EMG biofeedback training using feedback from the frontalis muscle only, and the other group received EMG biofeedback training using feedback from several muscle sites. It was hypothesized that subjects who were given EMG biofeedback relaxation training sequentially from several muscle sites would be able to lower EMG levels at these sites to a significantly greater degree than subjects who received EMG biofeedback relaxation training using feedback from the frontalis muscle only. Both groups were given a pre-training baseline session, nine training sessions, and a post-training baseline session. Comparing the mean pre- training and post- training baseline EMG levels of each group at each muscle site using t-tests showed that there was no significant reduction of EMG muscle activity at any monitored muscle site due to either frontalis feedback training only or multiple muscle feedback training. This failure to obtain significant training effects may have resulted from using college students as subjects since they were not trying to relieve a stress related disorder and they exhibited low initial baseline EMG levels. It is suggested that future research on the generalization of EMG biofeedback training be done using a clinical population having elevated EMG levels.

Graduation Date

1979

Advisor

Abbott, David W.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Social Sciences

Degree Program

Clinical Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

iv, 24 pages

Language

English

Rights

Written permission granted by copyright holder to the University of Central Florida Libraries to digitize and distribute for nonprofit, educational purposes.

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0003503

Subjects

Biofeedback training, Electromyography

Contributor (Linked data)

David W. Abbott (Q57702340)

Collection (Linked data)

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

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