Keywords

Heavy metals; Road drainage; Runoff; Sewage; Purification; Heavy metals removal; Storm water retention basins

Abstract

ABSTRACT Continuous flow column studies were conducted to characterize suspended sol ids and heavy metal reduct ions through sedimentation with varying overflow rates. The heavy metals tested were cadmium, zinc, copper, iron, lead, nickel and chromium. Stormwater derived samples spiked with street sweepings categorized into particle size ranges less than 500 microns in diameter were utilized in the research. Overflow rates investigated ranged from 28 to 3600 gallons per day per square foot. Theoretical predictions of suspended solids reductions with the application of Stoke's Law exceeded observed reductions for the continuous flow system. Performance curves for all reductions over the observed range of overflow rates are described by a parabolic relationship with the general equation as follows: Reduced fraction= a+ b(Overflow Rate - c) 2 where a, b and c are constants specific to each parameter. Similarities in performance curves for all metals indicate a dependence on suspended solids for reductions. Cadmium and chromium reductions were a function of overflow rate, but did not show a statistically significant dependence on initial total suspended solids concentration. Lead, copper, zinc and iron reductions were a function of initial total suspended solids concentration as well as overflow rate. Iron and nickel exhibited dependence on initial concentration of the specific metal for reductions, as well as dependence on overflow rate and initial total suspended solids concentration. The steady-state models selected from the results of this research for total suspended sol ids and each of the heavy metals are limited to the mixture, specific experimental conditions, and range of overflow rates observed in this research. Observed reductions of total suspended solids and heavy metals are considered to be 1 imited to physical sedimentation processes, in that processes that may effect reductions of these elements in a natural system are not factors in the results of this research.

Graduation Date

1988

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Dietz, John (J. D.)

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Format

PDF

Pages

120 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Identifier

DP0022604

Included in

Engineering Commons

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