Title

Decision-Framing Helps Make The Sale

Abstract

The objective of this article is to demonstrate the relevance for marketing practitioners of the recent research findings concerning the decisionframing process. An overview of recent empirical research findings is presented along with a brief description of the theoretical rationale on which this research is based. Actual and hypothetical examples of the importance of this work on decisionframing are offered for consumer marketers and consumer research practitioners. Decision-making processes employed by consumers to choose among available alternatives have received a large amount of research attention from marketers over the past two decades. However, relatively little research effort has focused on how consumers initially “frame” the choice problem. The decision-frame is defined as the way in which the choice problem, the alternatives, and the perceived consequences associated with the selection of an alternative are perceived by the decision maker. For example, when business students are told that a proposed new business venture has an 80 percent chance of success, the majority of the students give the goahead; when the new business venture decision is framed so that it has a 20 percent chance of failure, the majority turn it down.7 Thus, such research indicates that the framing of the alternatives has a substantial impact on the choice among the available alternatives, even when the objective information about the options is invariant.3,8,16. © 1989, MCB UP Ltd

Publication Date

1-1-1989

Publication Title

Journal of Consumer Marketing

Volume

6

Issue

2

Number of Pages

15-

Document Type

Article

Identifier

scopus

DOI Link

https://doi.org/10.1108/EUM0000000002543

Socpus ID

0001899768 (Scopus)

Source API URL

https://api.elsevier.com/content/abstract/scopus_id/0001899768

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