Title

DETECTION OF PLANETARY EMISSION FROM THE EXOPLANET TrES-2 USING SPITZER/IRAC

Authors

Authors

F. T. O'Donovan; D. Charbonneau; J. Harrington; N. Madhusudhan; S. Seager; D. Deming;H. A. Knutson

Comments

Authors: contact us about adding a copy of your work at STARS@ucf.edu

Abbreviated Journal Title

Astrophys. J.

Keywords

eclipses; infrared: stars; planetary systems; stars: individual (GSC; 03549-02811); techniques: photometric; EXTRASOLAR GIANT PLANETS; INFRARED ARRAY CAMERA; HD 189733B; HOT; JUPITERS; THERMAL EMISSION; SPACE-TELESCOPE; LIGHT CURVES; TEMPERATURE; INVERSION; TRANSITING PLANETS; DAYSIDE SPECTRUM; Astronomy & Astrophysics

Abstract

We present here the results of our observations of TrES-2 using the Infrared Array Camera on Spitzer. We monitored this transiting system during two secondary eclipses, when the planetary emission is blocked by the star. The resulting decrease in flux is 0.127% +/- 0.021%, 0.230% +/- 0.024%, 0.199% +/- 0.054%, and 0.359% +/- 0.060% at 3.6 mu m, 4.5 mu m, 5.8 mu m, and 8.0 mu m, respectively. We show that three of these flux contrasts are well fit by a blackbody spectrum with T(eff) = 1500 K, as well as by a more detailed model spectrum of a planetary atmosphere. The observed planet-to-star flux ratios in all four IRAC channels can be explained by models with and without a thermal inversion in the atmosphere of TrES-2, although with different atmospheric chemistry. Based on the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, the chemical composition of the inversion model seems more plausible, making it a more favorable scenario. TrES-2 also falls in the category of highly irradiated planets which have been theoretically predicted to exhibit thermal inversions. However, more observations at infrared and visible wavelengths would be needed to confirm a thermal inversion in this system. Furthermore, we find that the times of the secondary eclipses are consistent with previously published times of transit and the expectation from a circular orbit. This implies that TrES-2 most likely has a circular orbit, and thus does not obtain additional thermal energy from tidal dissipation of a non-zero orbital eccentricity, a proposed explanation for the large radius of this planet.

Journal Title

Astrophysical Journal

Volume

710

Issue/Number

2

Publication Date

1-1-2010

Document Type

Article

Language

English

First Page

1551

Last Page

1556

WOS Identifier

WOS:000274233300049

ISSN

0004-637X

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