Title

Effect of Scapular Stabilization During Horizontal Adduction Stretching on Passive Internal Rotation and Posterior Shoulder Tightness in Young Women Volleyball Athletes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Authors

Authors

P. A. Salamh; M. J. Kolber;W. J. Hanney

Comments

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Abbreviated Journal Title

Arch. Phys. Med. Rehabil.

Keywords

Athletes; Rehabilitation; Rotator cuff; Shoulder; DISABLED THROWING SHOULDER; BASEBALL PLAYERS; MUSCLE CHARACTERISTICS; GLENOHUMERAL ROTATION; MOTION; RANGE; IMPINGEMENT; JOINT; REHABILITATION; INJURIES; Rehabilitation; Sport Sciences

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effect of scapular stabilization during horizontal adduction stretching (cross-body) on posterior shoulder tightness (PST) and passive internal rotation (ER). Design: Randomized controlled trial with single blinding. Setting: Athletic club. Participants: Asymptomatic volleyball players who are women with glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (N=60). Interventions: Subjects were randomly assigned to either horizontal adduction stretching with manual scapular stabilization (n=30) or horizontal adduction stretching without stabilization (n=30). Passive stretching was performed for 3- to 30-second holds in both groups. Main Outcome Measures: Range of motion measurements of PST and IR were performed on the athlete's dominant shoulder prior to and immediately after the intervention. Results: Baseline mean angular measurements of PST and IR for all athletes involved in the study were 62 degrees+/-14 degrees and 40 degrees+/-10 degrees, respectively, with no significant difference between groups (P =.598 and P=.734, respectively). Mean PST measurements were significantly different between groups after the horizontal adduction stretch, with a mean angle of 83 degrees+/-17 degrees among the scapular stabilization group and 65 degrees+/-113 degrees among the nonstabilization group (P<.001). Measurements of IR were also significantly different between groups, with a mean angle of 51 degrees+/-14 degrees among the scapular stabilization group and 43 degrees+/-9 degrees among the nonstabilization group (P=.006). Conclusions: Horizontal adduction stretches performed with scapular stabilization produced significantly greater improvements in IR and PST than horizontal adduction stretching without scapular stabilization. (C) 2015 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

Journal Title

Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Volume

96

Issue/Number

2

Publication Date

1-1-2015

Document Type

Article

Language

English

First Page

349

Last Page

356

WOS Identifier

WOS:000348751800023

ISSN

0003-9993

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