Brian Hohl

Student

Brian Hohl

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Cohort

2018-2019

Biography

Brian attends UCF pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering. His areas of focus of biomechanics and medical devices are facilitated through additional coursework in biomedical sciences, biomechanics, and robotics. Brian has previously been a RAMA scholar and volunteered in the UCF Interventional Robotics Lab where he researched the design of pressure measurement devices for diagnosing Glaucoma. He is currently a RAMP scholar and research assistant working in the UCF Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Devices Lab where he is investigating the design of quasi passive prosthetic feet.

Faculty Mentor

Hwan Choi, Assistant Professor in the department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Undergraduate Major

Mechanical Engineering

Future Plans

Pursue a graduate degree in Mechanical Engineering and work in a lab conducting research in the areas of biomechanics, augmentation, and medical devices

Research

A REAL-TIME VARIABLE STIFFNESS AND TIMED RELEASE ANKLE PROSTHESIS RESEARCH PLATFORM Hwan Choi, Assistant Professor in the department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University of Central Florida “Passive Prostheses utilize material stiffness to recycle energy during gait. However, this energy is dissipated quickly which will cause it to provide little to no net ankle work and will mainly translate to upward support, rather than forward propulsion. Additionally, their invariant stiffness is suboptimal for all walking conditions. Powered prostheses contain motor driven ankle mechanisms which provide net ankle work, but require a more cumbersome configuration and a battery pack which needs to recharge. In this study, we will determine the influence of a quasi-passive, variable stiffness, prosthesis on gait kinematics across varied walking speeds. The purpose of this research is to inform the development of transtibial protheses through the investigation of design concepts and novel implementations.” ADVANCING TRANSPALPEBRAL TONOMETER FOR INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE MEASUREMENT | January 2018 – August 2018 Sang-Eun Song, Associate Professor in the department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University of Central Florida “The primary symptom of Glaucoma is vision loss so it is typically screened for using Intraocular Pressure (IOP) measurements taken by tonometry. Commonly used tonometers suffer from design flaws which hinder usability, accuracy, and diagnosis. This results in most who have Glaucoma going undiagnosed. The goal of this research is to design a portable transpalpebral tonometer which surpasses the accuracy of conventional tonometers while being capable of diurnal IOP monitoring.”

Keywords

Biomechanics, Medical Devices, Rehabilitation Engineering

Brian Hohl

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