Abstract

This research examined whether or not an auditory stimulus would affect rates of change blindness. Change blindness occurs when there is a failure to detect an obvious change to a visual scene. For this experiment 40 participants were asked to determine if a change occurred between two pictures. This involved an original picture shown for 1 second, a neutral screen shown for 50 milliseconds and then either a modified version of the original image or the same image for 1 second and then repeated. Participants then determined whether a change occurred in the visual display. For some participants a familiar song played on repeat during the visual task. My goal was to determine if music would affect rates of change blindness and how quickly changes would be detected if present. I found that participants in both the music and non-music conditions were more accurate when there was no change to a scene. Participants in the music condition also took longer to respond as opposed to the control group. When examining reaction times of only correct responses, both conditions responded in a similar amount of time for pictures with changes. In trials with no changes the participants in the music condition took longer to respond than the control group. Overall, it appears that music had a negative effect on reaction times when a change was present. Participants were also more accurate in detecting pictures with no changes as opposed to pictures with changes.

Notes

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Thesis Completion

2013

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Neider, Mark B.

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Degree Program

Psychology

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Sciences;Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic

Format

PDF

Identifier

CFH0004360

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Document Type

Honors in the Major Thesis

Included in

Psychology Commons

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