Abstract

The goal of my research is to examine motivations for upper mobility vs stagnation of people in poverty. Bandura (1971) states people’s motivations do not come from their willpower and people are not trapped in their situation. However, 43% of Americans born poor, remain poor as adults and 27% of people remain near poor to poor (Pew 2013). I will examine individuals with higher upper mobility aspirations (HUMA) and those individuals with lower upper mobility aspirations (LUMA) in order to provide the salient factors contributing to the desire for upward mobility. Five hypothesis will be analyzed; (1) Individuals with aspirations for personal growth and development will be more likely to have a positive linear relationship to their agency. (2) Individuals are more likely to have a strong belief in personal motivators than belief in structural barriers. (3) Individuals with beliefs in structural barriers will not believe in having to change behaviors for upward mobility. (4) There is an association between respondent’s race and individual’s motivation for upward mobility. (5) There is an association between respondent’s gender and individual’s motivation for upward mobility. My prediction is LUMA individual’s attitudes about assimilation and structural barriers prevent them from moving upward. They will strong negative feelings towards having to change their speech and dress style to be successful. I hope provide a better understanding of the emotional and structural barriers that hinder upward mobility.

Notes

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Thesis Completion

2015

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Donley, Amy M.

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Sociology

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Sciences; Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic

Format

PDF

Identifier

CFH0004799

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Document Type

Honors in the Major Thesis

Included in

Sociology Commons

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