Abstract

This interdisciplinary study combines epidemiological data with anthropological theory to investigate the relationship between HIV transmission rates and systemic homophobia. Previous research has illustrated the link between high levels of structural violence and structural stigma to increased risk of diseases such as the link between African-Americans and heart disease. This study investigates the relationship between systemic homophobia and HIV transmission rates. Through operationalizing homophobia into seven distinct factors, I evaluated systemic homophobia in six countries, assigning a score 1-10 to each factor using secondary source aggregation. I compared composite scores, as well as scores in each operationalized factor to HIV transmission rates in those countries. The results of this study indicate a correlation between systemic homophobia and increased HIV transmission, particularly in respect to the factors Marriage Equality, LGBT Laws, Religiosity, LGBT Visibility, and Hate Crimes. Though various sociocultural factors play a role in HIV transmission, this study indicates that homophobia plays an integral role in HIV transmission. This project has pertinent applications in epidemiology, anthropology and public health illustrating the integral role of sociocultural and systemic factors that increase structural violence and risk for a disease.

Notes

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Thesis Completion

2015

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Mishtal, Joanna

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Medicine

Department

Biomedical Sciences

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Medicine; Medicine -- Dissertations, Academic

Format

PDF

Identifier

CFH0004714

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Document Type

Honors in the Major Thesis

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