Title

Mass-elite dichotomy in application of risk theory

Abstract

There is risk involved in the decision making process. In many cases, individuals are required to rate the risk of one position against the other, to determine which risk is greater, before making a decision. This thesis explores the differences in how the mass public and elites (the Founding Fathers and modern lawyers) evaluate the risky choice involved in taking a position on the role of due process in American society. Utilizing contextual analysis and survey research, the thesis determines whether the groups hold a view of due process as paramount within society or as a danger to public safety, and the consistency of that viewpoint dependent on framing of situations. The results indicate that a mass-elite dichotomy does exist; the conclusion of the thesis suggests this as a possible explanation for why the masses can be swayed by ideological linguistics.

Notes

This item is only available in print in the UCF Libraries. If this is your thesis or dissertation, you can help us make it available online for use by researchers around the world by downloading and filling out the Internet Distribution Consent Agreement. You may also contact the project coordinator Kerri Bottorff for more information.

Thesis Completion

2000

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Pollock, Phillip H.

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Program

Political Science

Subjects

Arts and Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic;Dissertations, Academic -- Arts and Sciences

Format

Print

Identifier

DP0021551

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Document Type

Honors in the Major Thesis

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