Abstract

Extending lasing action into the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the electromagnetic spectrum has been a natural progression in the continuing development of short wavelength radiation sources. However fundamental difficulties with the media used to produce short wavelength lasers has in general hindered the widespread development and use of such lasers in applications. Up to now all EUV and soft x-ray lasers have operated with plasmas as the gain medium to support lasing. This is a general requirement imposed by 1) the characteristics of short wavelength radiation as it originates from highly energetic atomic transitions and 2) the fundamental aspects of lasing at these wavelengths. Thus the plasma environment has been the defining characteristic in achieving lasing in the EUV and soft x-ray spectral regions. This thesis presents investigations into two types of EUV/Soft x-ray lasers that describe the operation and associated plasma dynamics of these devices. The first is a numerical investigation into a recombination pumped x-ray laser at 13.5 nm operating in a Li plasma. Using a collisional-radiative model of the atomic system, simulations were performed to determine the plasma conditions necessary to produce gain that were observed in reported experiments. The second investigation is the experimental development and operation of a capillary discharge driven laser operating at 46.9 nm in Ar. This device is a new generation of EUV/Soft X-ray laser based on a small scale driver system. The first interferometric probing experiments of this device will be discussed and related to the plasma dynamics of the capillary discharge.

Graduation Date

1998

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Silfvast, William T.

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Physics

Degree Program

Physics

Format

PDF

Language

English

Rights

Written permission granted by copyright holder to the University of Central Florida Libraries to digitize and distribute for nonprofit, educational purposes.

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0011593

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