Keywords

Body language, Motivation (Psychology), Reward (Psychology)

Abstract

Individuals may approach an activity with either intrinsic motivation. Extrinsic motivational orientations are characterized by simplicity and predictability. Intrinsic motivation is characterized by novelty, complexity, and challenge. Task noncontingent rewards, in contrast to task contingent rewards, have been found to maintain or foster increases in intrinsic interest in a task. One explanation of this effect is that additional nonspecific factors like the perceived warmth of the experimenter was positively correlated with the noncontingent reward condition. To test this assumption, second grade subjects played with a game of intermediate complexity in one of four conditions: "cold" instructor with contingent reward, "cold" instructor with noncontingent rewards, "warm" instructor with contingent reward, and "warm" instructor with noncontingent reward. In a subsequent free-choice period, simple, intermediate, and complex versions of the game, as well as other activities, were available. The "warm" instructor was expected to create a greater positive affect toward the task which was measured by the amount of time spent with the complex game during free-choice time. Contrary to expectations, no significant difference was found between the four groups. Possible explanations of these findings are discussed.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1985

Semester

Summer

Advisor

McGuire, John M.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Program

Psychology

Format

PDF

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0016480

Included in

Psychology Commons

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