Keywords

Computer assisted instruction, Employees -- Training of

Abstract

There is a need for effective cost efficient training programs. Individual differences have been shown to be the most important variable in many training programs and they should be paid special attention in the design of training programs. Compared in this experiment is computer-controlled (lockstep) training, adaptive training, and learner-centered training. Learner-centered and adaptive training are geared to the individual. Instead of lockstep training, learner-centered training allows the trainee to determine the amount or sequence of training at different levels of proficiency. Adaptive training is training based on the participant's performance. As the participant's performance improves he or she is graduated to a harder level of the training program. In this experiment the dependent variable was the average number of crashes in the transfer trials. The ANOVA indicated there was a significant difference of type of training, F(2, 27) = 4.20, p=0.0251. Planned comparisons were performed to verify the hypotheses such that learner-centered would have the least number of crashes in transfer followed by adaptive and computer-controlled group having the most errors in transfer. As predicted the computer-controlled training group had significantly more crashes than adaptive and learner-centered in the transfer, F(1,27)=8015, p=0.0040, and F(1,27)=3.48, p=0.0348, respectively. Contrary to the hypotheses there was no significant difference between the adapted training group and the learner-centered training group, F(1,27)=0.9764, p=0.3336. As there was no significant difference between adaptive and learner-centered training groups this research suggests that as long as the trainee has some input into his or her training whether adaptively or self-paced, the learning will be superior to learning in a pre-programmed manner.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1986

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Wooten, William

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

30 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0019501

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