Keywords

Community colleges -- Florida -- Administration, Education, Higher, Universities and colleges -- Florida -- Administration, Women college administrators, Women in education

Abstract

Surveys of women in higher education administrative positions that identified factors which may contribute to career development have been conducted. However, the literature revealed little information regarding the importance placed on those factors by women in higher education administrative positions. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of selected contributors to career development of women in higher education administration. Data were gathered by a mailed questionnaire to a sample of women administrators employed in Florida state supported community colleges and universities. The 343 useable returned questionnaires represented a 65.5% response rate and 51.3% of the total population. These data were evaluated in terms of: a) the factors identified by women, b) race and age, c) administrative level by institution type, and d) institution type. Descriptive data analysis was conducted using frequency distributions and histograms. Cross tabulation analysis with all statistical options and a one-way analysis of variance were also utilized. There were four factors considered important for which there were no significant differences across the variables of institution type, administrative level by institution type, and selected demographic characteristics. These factors were formal education, willingness to accept added responsibility, timing, and communication skills. The contributing factors showing importance by administrative level by institution type were: chance, participation in a formal administrative internship, committee appointments, and teaching experience. Those factors viewed as important by institution type were: willingness to relocate (community college) and research and publications (university). The factors considered important by age were: a) Affirmative Action plans, b) influence of a mentor, c) personnel administration skills, d) participation in a formal administrative internship, and e) research. The results of the study indicated that women desiring to advance into higher education administrative positions should develop a career plan to include the institution type desired for career development. In addition, women should give serious consideration to the four factors showing no significant difference by institution type, or by selected demographic characteristics.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1986

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Hudson, Larry

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education

Department

Educational Services

Degree Program

Administration and Supervision

Format

PDF

Pages

226 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0019509

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