Abstract

Sailfin molly populations often experience a midsummer slump in reproduction, and it has been suggested that this slump is caused by food shortage. A food supplementation experiment on a natural population of mollies was done in 1983. Excess food did not directly affect the fecundity of females in the field. A laboratory experiment was designed to determine the food level on reproduction in females. Ration had the greatest effect on somatic condition and growth, indirectly influencing fecundity. Two explanations for this strategy are suggested. A significant difference in brood size and size of young was observed between the field and lab broods at all ration levels. The possibility of plasticity being an integral component of the sailfin molly’s life history strategy is discussed.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1986

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Snelson, Franklin F.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Biology

Format

PDF

Pages

144 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0019579

Included in

Biology Commons

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