Keywords

Freshwater zooplankton -- Florida, Lakes -- Florida, Little Lake Barton, Fla

Abstract

Zooplankton abundance, hydrilla biomass, and physicochemical parameters were sampled for one year in a small central Florida lake. Annually, rotifers comprised most of the species collected and were the most abundant zooplankton group. Hydrilla biomass was lowest during winter and spring while orthophosphate and phtoplankton concentrations were highest. Zooplankton densities were highest when hydrilla biomass was low. Small-bodied limnetic herbivores comprised most of the zooplankton during the spring. Zooplanton abundances were lowest during summer and fall and may have been either directly or indirectly related to the hydrilla growth. Factors, such as lower phytoplankton and dissolved oxygen concentrations, possible increased predation by fish, and substances that may have been secreted by the hydrilla may have had a negative effect on the lake's zooplankton density. Littoral zooplankton species were frequently collected from the lake when hydrilla biomass was high. Species diversity (─æ) was lowest during winter and spring and ranged from 1.69 to 2.11; species diversity peaked during the summer reaching 3.04.

Notes

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Graduation Date

Fall 1980

Advisor

Osborne, John A.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Program

Biology

Format

PDF

Pages

72 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0013320

Included in

Biology Commons

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