Abstract

The chemistry of propane continues to play a pivotal role in today's power production technologies. As reliance on natural gas expands as greener cleaner fuels are sought throughout the world, especially as countries are attempting to transition away from traditional coal and crude-oil fired plants towards solar, wind, and hydro-electric sources. Natural gas, often seen as a bridge fuel between these two competing ends, has been in the recent past and for the foreseeable future will continue to play an important role in the energy sector. Among the components of natural gas, propane plays a key role in the chemistry for both pyrolysis and combustion. While the composition of natural gas is primarily dominated by the presence of methane, the heavier hydrocarbons especially propane dominates the chemistry of reactions. Thus, developing a healthy understanding of the pyrolysis of propane will aid in deepening insights into the chemistry that dominates that of natural gas. The pyrolysis of propane was carried out behind reflected shockwaves at elevated temperatures. Species concentration histories were recorded simultaneously using a broadband mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator to probe the reacting flows. Concentration histories for methane, acetylene, ethylene, ethane, propene, and propane were collected over a range of pressures and temperatures (pressures of ~4 to 5 atm, and temperatures of 1105 to 1304 K). These species were chosen due to there prevalence in the computational and theoretical framework of the pyrolysis of propane, but have been difficult to experimentally measure due to overlapping molecular absorption spectra.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2022

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Vasu Sumathi, Subith

Degree

Master of Science in Environmental Engineering (M.S.Env.E.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Program

Aerospace Engineering; Thermofluid Aerodynamic Systems

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008987; DP0026320

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0026320

Language

English

Release Date

5-15-2023

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Campus-only Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until 5-15-2023; it will then be open access.

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