Abstract

Habitually poor posture can lead to repetitive strain injuries that lower an individual's quality of life and productivity. Slouching over computer screens and smart phones, asymmetric weight distribution due to uneven leg loading, and improper loading posture are some of the common examples that lead to postural problems and health ramifications. To help cultivate good postural habits, researchers have proposed slouching, balance, and improper loading posture detection systems that alert users through traditional visual, auditory or vibro-tactile feedbacks when posture requires attention. However, such notifications are disruptive and can be easily ignored. We address these issues with a new physiological feedback system that uses sensors to detect these poor postures, and electrical muscle stimulation to automatically correct the poor posture. We compare our automatic approach against other alternative feedback systems and through different unique contexts. We find that our approach outperformed alternative traditional feedback systems by being faster and more accurate while delivering an equally comfortable user experience.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2022

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Laviola II, Joseph

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Degree Program

Modeling and Simulation

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0009001; DP0026334

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0026334

Language

English

Release Date

May 2022

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until May 2022; it will then be open access.

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