Abstract

Using a qualitative approach, this study examined disclosure patterns of women who have experienced symptoms of postpartum depression (PPD). Postpartum depression is a mental illness that new parents are at risk of developing. If left unresolved, PPD can have severe, negative impacts on the development of the baby and the well-being of the parent. Unfortunately, due to the stigmatized nature of the illness, parents are sometimes reluctant to bring up their struggles with this illness and seek help. Eighteen women who had experienced PPD within the past five years were recruited and participated in an interview where they were asked questions regarding their disclosure behaviors. Using Communication Privacy Management Theory (CPM), the data were examined to explain disclosure patterns. Findings were discovered using a thematic analysis. Themes of disclosure processes, disclosure considerations, boundary maintenance, and effects of disclosure were prompted by the theory and several subthemes were discovered in the data.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2022

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Miller, Ann

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Nicholson School of Communication and Media

Degree Program

Communication

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0009018; DP0026351

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0026351

Language

English

Release Date

May 2022

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Included in

Communication Commons

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