Abstract

Ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) are widely used to monitor ions in various applications from environmental to clinical settings and pharmaceutical analysis. ISEs are a type of potentiometric sensor that provides a versatile, cost-effective, and efficient platform towards wearable sensing applications. Among the two different platforms of ISEs (solid-contact and liquid-contact), solid-contact ISEs are superior to ISEs with internal electrolytes (liquid-contact) since they are easy to be miniaturized, can be used in any environment and their portability is facilitated. Unfortunately, mass production and commercialization of such devices is often constrained by the requirement of sensor calibration. Thus, approaches for sensor manufacturing towards improving sensor to sensor reproducibility is a need, mainly for wearable sensors applications. This work discusses the development and characterization of calibration-free ISEs for the selective detection of different ions (Na+, K+ and Fluoxetine). The sensor response is measured using the NERNST equation that relates concentration with electromotive force (electrical potential). To obtain reproducible potentials from sensor to senor, different optimizations were performed such as components of the ion-selective membrane (ISM) and solid contact support. Effect of ion-selective membrane (ISM) solvent on ISE reproducibility was studied by comparing tetrahydrofuran (THF) (a typical solvent for membrane preparation) and cyclohexanone. In addition, a single-step integration of semiconducting/transducer polymer poly(3-octylthiophene) (POT) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) into the ISEs substrate was introduced. Upon full optimization, highly reproducible paper-based ion-selective electrodes and wearable sensors for the measurement of sodium and potassium ions in aqueous solution and artificial sweat were fabricated. This technology was also applied for the development of a highly reproducible paper-based ion-selective electrode for the determination of fluoxetine.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2021

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Chumbimuni Torres, Karin

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Chemistry

Degree Program

Chemistry

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0009125; DP0026458

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0026458

Language

English

Release Date

February 2022

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until February 2022; it will then be open access.

Included in

Chemistry Commons

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